“Really Rococo” Series by Ebba Lindgren – Turning textile waste into treasures

Sustainability and eccentric Rococo style align in the “Really Rococo” series by Malmö-based designer and artist Ebba Lindgren. The end result is furniture – a desk and a stool – for the self-proclaimed and environmentally-conscious royals of today.

Lindgren received an Industrial Design MFA from Lund University and also attended Emily Carr School of Art in Vancouver, Canada. Her approach to design is both artistic and context-driven, as exemplified in the “Really Rococo” series with its focus on reusable material and (art) historical references.

The “Really Rococo” desk and stool were originally commissioned by M.U.S. (Malmö Upcycling Service) for the collective exhibition, “Last Minute”, at the Swedish Embassy in Denmark during 3daysofdesign.

As the name of the series already suggests, the pieces are loosely based on the asymmetrical and nature-inspired Rococo style. Together, they represent a workplace for emotional labor and social maintenance. They were inspired by the ”Bonheur-Du-Jour”, a type of letter-writing desk popular among women in the 1700s.

The objects are made out of “Really Board”, a textile waste fibreboard with a core of discarded hotel bedlinen and a coating of shredded textile off-cuts. Created by the brand “Really”, this material allows designers, such as Lindgren, to address a global issue negatively affecting the environment by turning waste into functional and artistic objects.

Lindgren’s “Really Rococo” series was also featured as part of ADORNO’s “PROXIMITY” collection, presented earlier this year during Southern Sweden Design Days in Malmö, Sweden, 17 – 22 May.

View the “Really Rococo” Series by Ebba Lindgren here >

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