"Récamier" Daybed

by Mantas Lesauskas Lithuania

8.712 Incl.21% VAT

10 in stock

Insured Delivery: 720
Est delivery: Feb 10th, 2022
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Dimension LxWxH (cm): 220x75x75
Open Editions Material : Aluminium, Aluminum, sheep wool
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Description

Having analysed the traditional use of natural materials, designer Mantas Lesauskas has explored alternatives to the use of materials of animal origin, such as sheepskin. Even though these substances are a by-product of the meat industry, the ethical dilemma of using them still exists, and objects made with them retain the hunter’s collective sense of guilt. In the face of the Anthropocene era, Lesauskas’ goal is to glorify and honour the end of life in the best and most beautiful possible form of supposed “reincarnation” as if standing on a pedestal.

By combining ethically sourced materials such as sheepskin with polished edges of patinated aluminium sheets for “Récamier”, the designer seeks to inspire us to rethink our being and the impermanence of life.

Additional information

Weight 80 kg
Dimensions 200 × 120 × 120 cm
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About the designer


Mantas Lesauskas

Designer Mantas Lesauskas investigates the longevity of natural raw and precious materials in his pieces. The desire to create long-lasting furniture for multiple generations requires responsible insight into their archetypes and rituals. By creating limited edition furniture and using materials and methods typical of sculpture, the designer aims to give these objects the opportunity to challenge us like sculpture. The designer is constantly inspired by artisan skills to responsibly combine these traditions with smart industrial manufacturing processes. Mantas is a graduate of the Department of Design at the Vilnius Academy of Arts. In his earlier projects he pursued conceptual and social design theories. His Bin Toy, Millegome, Eurofurniture (2008), and It’s Also a Table (2009) expressed the importance of ecological issues and questioned the value of newly created objects. In 2011, he was awarded a Licentiate of Arts after defending an art project and thesis entitled ‘Narratives of Nostalgia in Design Objects’.  He is also an associate professor at the Design Department at Vilnius Academy of Arts. Mantas Lesauskas believes in showing contradictions and taboos, but avoids judging them.

Curated by

The body of work in this collection consists of pieces by Greek designers of the mainland and the diaspora, or international professionals who live and work in Greece. As a common theme we tackle the elusive notion of “Greekness” and how this transpires through the work of seemingly diverse and distinct individuals. In our attempt to define “Greekness”, we aim to raise questions about how this plays out in the work presented. How do Greek designers view their identity? Is it through their effort to decipher their heavy heritage? Is form important in order to achieve a predisposed classic elegance, or is a philosophical disposition towards shape more poignant? Could it be simply a resourcefulness and DIY ethic to make up for the absence of design infrastructure? How do Greek designers based abroad deal with their background? Could it be that they simply ignore it in order to finally free themselves? Is there a certain amount of innovation necessary in order to channel it into the new environment? Finally, how do foreign designers see their work influenced by their Greek surroundings? Is it the reference through the use of noble materials such as marble or the abundance of natural light that makes their work unquestionably Greek? Or could it be something else they were seeking when they decided to move here, something abstract like humour or drama? Could their arrival finally mean a departure from Greek heritage’s self-reference? The pieces that we present might seem ill-matched, but they share an important core element. They are confident in their narrative of a personal story of identity, that is either at peace or against the Greek archetype. Through this communication, they all describe a culturally mature and vibrant scene that is finally extroverted and coming of age.