Skógarnytjar: Chair Prototype #01

by studio Björn Steinar Iceland

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1 in stock

Insured Delivery: 81
Est delivery: Oct 5th, 2021
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Dimension LxWxH (cm): 46x42x81
Unique Pieces Material : Wood
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Description

After having been a treeless country for a thousand years the Icelandic forests are reaching a usable state. Due to a lack of forest culture over 90% of the harvested wood ends up being burned for heavy industries.

Prototype #02 is from the Skógarnytjar furniture collection. The collection was designed with the needs of the forestry sector and the available production techniques around the island, the outcome is simple and minimal furniture carefully crafted out of quality materials. By increasing the value of the wood with simple elegant design the foundation of forestry nationwide is strengthened alongside various pros for ecosystems and the environment.

Prototype #02, alongside the other prototypes, were designed and handcrafted by the designer from start to finish.

Additional information

Weight 5 kg
Dimensions 50 × 50 × 85 cm
discipline

Wood & Cabinetmaking

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About the designer


studio Björn Steinar

Björn Steinar is an enthusiastic designer who strives towards bringing around societal change through his design practice. Björn is from a generation of product designers; designing into a world over flooded with products and useless temptations. The world is in dire need of solutions to an array of problems, which is why Björn tends towards what he calls an anti-capitalistic design method; honest design practice with a real purpose.

Recent works include Banana Story - an explanation of the world condition from the standpoint of a banana, Catch of the day – fighting food waste by handcrafting vodka from dumpster dived fruits and Skógarnytjar - mobilizing Icelandic designers and foresters to create a culture around utilization of a new resource in a previously woodless country. The three research-driven projects echo Björn’s vision of using design as a medium for conveying ideas. Strong narratives and expressive simple solutions, combined with close collaborations, place his local context as a metaphor for the world in a solution-oriented dialogue. Always proposing a solution, no matter how complex the problem.

Curated by

Often the ordinary and visible present becomes vague and forgotten. Analogue experiences have boiled down to a minimum during the last years. We are currently in a situation where much of our regular rhythm was interrupted, the everyday was frozen and almost disappeared for a while. It became particularly evident how the environment we are functioning in, what we have or possess, matters. Layers of the past provide a means to describe the world and rethink the evident. Remembering and untangling the past and the local provides a captivating perspective through types of objects, materials, and methods of making. The Estonian collection, “Revisiting the Past”, is based on tracking the everyday and the conventional, translating observations, reconsiderations, and hints of the past into contemporary design. More than ever, the future is about rethinking the present and the past, of what we have and need. The past is heavily coded in our future.