KOL

by Studio Kajsa Willner Sweden

3.750 Incl.25% VAT

1 in stock

Insured Delivery: 300
Est delivery: Nov 4th, 2021
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Dimension LxWxH (cm): 40x40x45
Unique piece Material : MDF, Mirrorglass
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Description

Burning coal is a major cause of carbon dioxide emissions. Despite this knowledge, the use of coal is increasing and it is expected to continue doing so. My project, “KOL”, is inspired by coal with its beautiful, shiny surface that stands in contrast to the materials’ devastating consequences for both man and earth.

When I developed this concept, I was fascinated by the many stories that the material carries and its history. All from the harsh life in the coal mines (like here in Skåne, Höganäs), innovation, development, fuel, or just the fact that a diamond is composed of carbon atoms arranged in a particular pattern. Somehow I got caught up in the contradiction that a material that has so much darkness and dirtiness to it can also be experienced as so incredibly beautiful visually.

In my fascination for the material, I decided to try to transfer that feeling of the material so that it would be reflected in both shape and material. That’s why I choose to make jars for jewellery because it’s associated with valuable things and that’s also why I choose to work with black MDF, since it’s a material with similar characteristics as coal. It has this powder that is black and sticks everywhere and it is also dangerous to inhale during production.

The side table is supposed to be an exaggerated almost kitschy interpretation of my own double feeling towards coal.

Additional information

Weight 26 kg
Dimensions 42 × 43 × 50 cm
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About the designer


Studio Kajsa Willner

Studio Kajsa Willner is a cross-disciplinary business working with designing products on commission and for studio production, visualizing spatial installations, as curator and exhibition architect and with initiating new projects in collaboration with other organizations or partners.   Her studio sets out to playfully challenge conceptions of what design is and should be, creating products and interiors that introduce new ideas and concepts into everyday life.   Kajsa Willner has an international experience and holds a bachelor degree in furniture and industrial design. After finishing her studies in Italy Kajsa moved to the Netherlands to gain some work experience. She returned to Sweden and founded Studio Kajsa Willner in Malmö 2013.   Studio Kajsa Willner has exhibited at Liljevalchs, was nominated for Young Swedish Form 2014/15, and won bronze in the A’ Design Award in 2017. In 2016 Kajsa was awarded an artist-in-residence by Konst in Halland at the Centre of Polish Sculpture in Oronsko. Later in 2019 Kajsa Willner and Swedese will launch their collaboration on site specific furniture pieces commissioned for the re-opening of Hallands Konstmuseum, curated by Jenny Nordberg.   The style of Studio Kajsa Willner is characterazied by the meeting between minimalism and naivism with a penchant for the unconventional.

Curated by

Currently there exists a group of designers who have reintroduced the vitality of craft into Turkish design. Their work is a continuation of the craft techniques adapted to contemporary fabrication. Importantly, they have also reorganized the symbolic potential of local Turkish craft, working directly with craftspeople who are more centrally involved in the creation of these designs. Designers working as collaborators with these craftspeople invigorate design and, at the same, using the means of handcraft, rejuvenate the symbolic import of design through a focus on gesture, form, and technique revealing a latent symbolism organically driven through process. This focus on touch leads to another feature of Turkish design: the imperfect gesture. Gestures ranging from the perfect to the imperfect are an important factor in the final form of an object. They determine the shape and contours of objects in their realization, and have an underlying iconic potency. For thousands of years, the performance of the hand in cutting, shaping, molding, and chiseling materials was the key factor in the final form of many objects. The hand’s capabilities and limitations guided the process in which function was realized, and also resulted in the aesthetics and stylization of the object, generating what can be described as “latent symbolic force”. The aesthetic and stylistic symbolism connects the object to its maker and designers giving a sense of authorial identity and originality to each work. The designer and craftsperson collaboratively and cooperatively realize this design, thus connecting to the symbolic potential of craft and objects. With geometry and pattern as a basis, form is realized within the material production of design, its techniques, and material constraints, resulting in what we can loosely term as the idiom of Turkish design in this synthesis of symbol and craft.