Alma-Raíz Stool & Table Collection

by YANKATU - Maria Fernanda Paes de Barros Brazil

975 - 1.660 Incl.0% TAX
Insured Delivery: 98
Est delivery: Oct 7th, 2021
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Each variation may differt Dimension LxWxH (cm): 35x35x36, 45x45x46, 55x55x57
Limited Editions Material : Cabreuva wood, copper wires, Natural Dyed
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Description

Through a careful observation, full of respect and admiration, every day I understand a little more about this fascinating universe and the incredible artists that translate it through their hands. The Alma-Raíz collection is born from my ever-deepening research of Brazilian identity.

Tucumã straws, a palm typical of the Amazon Forest, receives natural dyeing with pigments also found in the region as caapiranga, margarataia, crajiru, jenipapo and urucum. Indigenous ancestry that crosses generations and today flows gracefully through the hands of Urucureá artisans, who braid the straw on the banks of the Arapiuns River, in Pará.

Benches and tables, like drums that resound stories, perpetuate what pulses Brazilian land. Made of Cabreúva wood and tucumã straw, they overflow Amazon rainforest’s colors and strength.

Naturally dyed straw have unique characteristics that never repeat. Due to this process the colors fade more easily than the industrial one, this is not considered a defect, it’s a way for it to tell its own story. At the time of ordering you should check what options are available.

The dyeing of the straws is done by artisans of Urucureá riverside community, who also braided the straws creating traditional prints from Arapiuns river region.

About the designer


YANKATU - Maria Fernanda Paes de Barros

My motivation comes from my soul and flows openly, on my life and in my work. I love what I do and I do it with intensity, I live every moment and I transmit all this emotion. In each project I immerse myself deeply in the region, in their craft and in the lives of the people who make them, it is a dive governed by research and by my soul, guided by the heart, done with respect and with the rhythm dictated by time. I get transformed and provoke transformations, and these atitudes reflect in the surroundings and beyond. I believe that design and art are one of the ways to value and eternalize the ancestral knowledge of Brazilian traditional crafts and the importance of nature around us, and so I use all tools that I have to create a quilt of infinite possibilities, full of feelings. Through Yankatu I expose not only my work, I bring with me the dreams and works of the artisans and instigate new dreams. The tangible part of this work are the pieces that intertwine my touch with the lives that share their moments with me. The other part, immeasurable, is in continuous development, in a mixture of art and freedom, with no date to finish. It is a continuous development, in a relationship created around respect and trust. My desire, to be able to do this as long as I live.

Curated by

Often the ordinary and visible present becomes vague and forgotten. Analogue experiences have boiled down to a minimum during the last years. We are currently in a situation where much of our regular rhythm was interrupted, the everyday was frozen and almost disappeared for a while. It became particularly evident how the environment we are functioning in, what we have or possess, matters. Layers of the past provide a means to describe the world and rethink the evident. Remembering and untangling the past and the local provides a captivating perspective through types of objects, materials, and methods of making. The Estonian collection, “Revisiting the Past”, is based on tracking the everyday and the conventional, translating observations, reconsiderations, and hints of the past into contemporary design. More than ever, the future is about rethinking the present and the past, of what we have and need. The past is heavily coded in our future.